16 November 2010

The Weather Rock

CAMP SHELBY, Miss., August 2010--The Weather Rock hangs in front of Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 113th Cavalry Regiment (1/113th Cav.). It is bigger than your first, smaller than your head, and is suspended by olive-drab "550" cord used by Army parachutists. As such, it can withstand theoretical wind speeds far in excess of my ability to combine math and physics. Science, after all, is hard.

Saber2th is the one who introduced me to the Weather Rock. He and The Hamster, his sidekick and usual partner in crime. Part of their team's job involves reporting the weather, and its potential effects on military operations--if it's going to be too windy for aircraft operations, for example.

That's where the Weather Rock comes in.

Saber2th explains how it works:
"When the Weather Rock is warm to the touch, that means it's hot. When the Weather Rock is cool, that means it's cold. If it's wet, it's raining. If it's swinging back and forth, it's windy. If it's moist, it's humid. If it's jerking wildly about, there's been an earthquake."
He says this all straight-faced and deadpan and official-sounding, of course, as if he were briefing the time of day or the color of the sky. It is a beautiful thing to behold. He is in his element. He is rocking the TOC.

The Weather Rock: Get yours today! Results may vary. Void where prohibited.

6 comments:

  1. Ahhhhh...the Weather Rock. Not many soldiers know about that system. Always works, never needs a battery, no computer, simple and easy to use...even a grunt can figure it out.

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  2. And ... it can be used in hand-to-hand combatives! (CCO extra.)

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  3. @ TSBTS: Thanks! I thought the same thing about your recent form-letter suggestion. I'll let you know how I incorporate your advice into my own nefarious communications with buddies downrange!

    Keep up the great work!

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  4. I love the acronym on it...weather, rock (1 ea.?) Lol!! Love it!

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  5. Here in CO, near the Wyo line, we use a chain welded to a post. If the chain is missing, we "know" that the wind is blowing....

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